What is the Turing Program?

All information correct as of July 2022

Want to work or study abroad but don't think you have enough money to do it? Well worry no more, the Turing Program, also known as the Turing Scheme, gives UK students the funding they need to experience once in a lifetime opportunities abroad. Following the UK's decision to leave the EU at the start of 2021, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that the UK will no longer be participating in the Erasmus+ programme. For the last two decades, the Erasmus program has offered students from all over Europe the funding to work or study abroad in the EU’s 32 participating nations. The UK's decision to replace Erasmus+ with the Turing Scheme brings a few significant changes for students wanting to move abroad.


The Turing Scheme, named after the father of computer science Alan Turing, was launched in September 2021. The new UK government programme is providing funding of over £100 million per year for  international opportunities in education and training across the world. It aims to help students develop both personally and professionally by financing a portion of their living costs while they reside in other countries. The programme will run until at least 2025 with one major deviation from the Erasmus programme, it will operate not just in the EU, but globally. Nearly 160 destinations, including the United States, Canada, Japan and Australia will be available for Turing funding should a student want to undertake a work placement or study in that location.

What is the Turing Scheme?

Who is Eligible For Turing Scheme Funding?

The Turing scheme funding will enable an estimated 40,000 UK students a year to work or study abroad. It is open to university students as well as those in vocational training, those who are retraining through a college or school and apprentices. Requirements for whether you can qualify for Turing funding vary depending on whether you're in Higher Education (HE), Further Education (FE), Vocational Education and Training (VET) or still at school. If the Turing Scheme officially recognises the UK education provider you participate in, or if you're retraining or upskilling through a college or school, then you're likely to qualify for funding.

With the introduction of the Turing Scheme, the UK government put an emphasis on their programme having a greater focus on helping students from disadvantaged backgrounds. This includes both lower-income students and students with special needs and disabilities. In order to increase the participation of disadvantaged groups, the Turing Scheme will actively target and promote the scheme in geographical areas of disadvantage and provide additional financial support to disadvantaged students.

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How Much Money Do You Get From the Turing Scheme?

There is no single answer for how much Turing funding you will get when studying or working abroad. The amount you receive will depend on where you're going and how long you go. For short-term placements between 4 to 8 weeks, you can receive from £120 to £136 per week. If you're staying longer than 8 weeks then funding will range from £335 to £545 per month to help with living costs. The Turing funding comes in the form of a grant too, meaning it does not need to be paid back.

Unlike Erasmus, the Turing Scheme will not cover tuition fees for those wanting to study abroad. Instead, it is expected that higher education providers will partner with other higher education providers and agree tuition fee waivers in order to facilitate student study placements.

As previously mentioned, additional financial support will be offered to students from deprived backgrounds. Poorer students will receive additional expenses to cover the costs of travel expenses, passports, visas and health insurance. For example, travel expenses of up to £1,360 can be covered if applicable. Students with special needs or disabilities will have up to 100% of costs for support directly related to their additional needs covered too.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Do you have to pay back Turing Scheme?

  • The Turing funding comes in the form of a grant, meaning it does not need to be paid back.

  • Is the Turing Scheme only for EU countries?

  • The Turing Scheme operates, with funding available for nearly 160 destinations, including the United States, Canada, Japan and Australia.

  • Am I eligible for the Turing Scheme?

  • If the Turing Scheme officially recognises the UK education provider you participate in, or if you're retraining or upskilling through a college or school, then you're likely to qualify for funding.

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